Ron Rivera known as a trick play from ‘Little Giants’ on Thanksgiving and followers beloved it

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Ron Rivera called a trick play from 'Little Giants' on Thanksgiving and fans loved it

Ron Rivera is the gift given over and over in the NFL.

"Riverboat Ron" has long been one of the most respected coaches in all of football. He dates back to his time as the Panthers head coach where he played and tried to move down before it went mainstream across the league. His first season as head coach of the Washington Football Team was one of the toughest of his career as he had to balance coaching while undergoing cancer treatment. But Rivera proved on Thanksgiving against the Cowboys that he's still the fun-loving coach he was with Carolina.

On a second-and-5 at the Dallas 16 in the first half, Washington played a "fumblerooski" game that resulted in a 6-yard run for J.D. McKissic led. At first glance, it's a decent piece, but on closer inspection, many fans recognized it as "The Annexation of Puerto Rico", the famous trick game from the 1994 classic "Little Giants".

Here is a video of the original game for your reference. Perhaps there were fewer plays in Washington's version.

Rivera, who is half Puerto Rican on his father's side, said after the game that the game call was actually inspired by the famous "Little Giants" game and that he saw the movie "100 times" with his kids who love the movie.

Rivera also said the team named the game "Bumerooski," after legendary soccer coach Bum Phillips who invented the special variant of the game.

MORE: How Rivera Underwent Cancer Treatments While Training WFT

This is not even the first time a Rivera-led team has carried out The Annexation of Puerto Rico. The Panthers ran it against the Texans in 2011, with Richie Brockel running it for a touchdown.

It's games like this that make Rivera a treasure in the NFL. Bringing out an old backyard soccer trick for Thanksgiving is a great way to get popular with soccer fans across the country. And beating the Cowboys 41-16 doesn't hurt either.